CT Lung Cancer Screening

Download/print the CT Lung Cancer Screening patient brochure

Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and accounted for 27% of all cancer deaths in 2014. Nearly 160,000 people in the U.S. died from lung cancer in 2014 -- more than breast, colon and prostate cancer combined.

  • About two out of three people diagnosed with lung cancer are 65 or older.
  • Fewer than 2% of all cases are found in people younger than 45.
  • Lung Cancer Screening can help detect lung cancer earlier, when it's more treatable.

Watch this video to learn more about CT Lung Cancer Screening:

What is a CT Lung Cancer Screening?

A chest CT lung cancer screening is a low-dose (low-radiation) chest CT exam used to detect early stage lung cancer before signs or symptoms appear. The screening may detect lung abnormalities or nodules that would not otherwise be visible on a plain chest x-ray. Many nodules will be non-cancerous and require no treatment. Some nodules may require further testing.

Who should have this screening?

CT Lung Cancer Screening is considered an annual exam, and intended for individuals who meet the following criteria:

  • Men and women who are between the ages of 55 to 80 (Medicare ages 55-77) and
  • Current or former smokers (quit within last 15 years) and
  • 30 pack year history (number of packs per day x number of years smoked)
Why should I have the screening?

An x-ray of the chest can be taken to look for early lung cancer, but recent medical studies have shown that low-dose CT scans provide better results. CT scans are able to detect very small nodules in the lung. Chest CT is especially effective for diagnosing lung cancer at its earliest, most curable stage.

In 2010, the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) found 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among participants screened with low-dose CT compared to those screened with chest X-rays.

What does the screening tell me?

A low-dose chest CT screening may detect lung abnormalities or nodules that would not otherwise be visible on a plain chest x-ray. Many nodules will be non-cancerous and require no treatment. Some nodules may require further testing. 

What happens after my screening?

Your images will be interpreted by one of our board-certified radiologists. The results will be sent to your healthcare provider, so that they can review the results with you and determine if any follow-up is needed.

Is the screening covered by insurance?

If the screening criteria is met (in "Who should have this screening"), CT Lung Cancer Screenings are covered by most insurance companies, including Medicare, with a referral from a healthcare provider. Be sure to check with your insurance plan to see if coverage is available for you.

LCSClogo.png

Suburban Imaging clinics are designated Lung Cancer Screening Centers by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Read more about this designation here.


Calculate Your Risk:
http://www.shouldiscreen.com/lung-cancer-risk-calculator/

Latest Blog Post

A pain management injection is an image-guided injection of medication…

Read More

A CAT scan is a large x-ray that also combines a computer to process i…

Read More

Twitter Feed

ACRLogo.png ACLogo.png ACLogo.png
ImageWiselyLogo.png ImageGentlyLogo.png

Privacy bottom_hairline.png Legal

new_facebook.png new_twitter.png new_linkIn.png transparent_youtube.png